Eastern Classical Singing Classes

T2F is proud to offer lessons in eastern classical and semi-classical singing by Ustad Zafar Ali Khan, a vocalist and composer representing the 28th generation of the Gwalior gharana. Gwalior, the home of Mian Tansen, is also the site of what is considered to be the oldest gharana of sub-continental classical music.

Ustad Zafar Ali Khan received vocal training from the age of 6 by his father, Ustad Qudrat Ali Khan. His vocal repertoire includes khayal, thumri, dadra, ghazal, geet and kaafi. He is well-versed in the tabla and harmonium, and his compositions have featured in the media, including films, television and radio.

zafaralikhan.jpg

Lesson Structure

  • 15 minutes of riyaaz – vocal exercises to stretch and train the vocal chords and tune the ear
  • 20 minutes of sangeet – bandish, ghazal, khayal etc, to apply riyaaz training to the delivery of sangeet
  • 25 minutes of theory, including Q&A

Important Notes

  • Classes will be held on Saturdays and Sundays from 12:00 noon to 1:00 pm
  • Classes begin on April 3rd 2010. Enrollment will close after the second class
  • Duration: 3 months / 24 classes
  • Cost: Rs. 1,500 per class
  • E-mail sabeen@peaceniche.org to register

Lecture Demo by Ustad Zafar Ali Khan

Ustad Zafar Ali Khan will be at T2F on Friday, March 12th at 6:30 pm, to introduce himself and his approach to teaching singing. If you are interested in getting vocal instruction from a scion of the oldest classical gharana, come and meet the Ustad, hear him sing and sign up!

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5 Responses to Eastern Classical Singing Classes

  1. sabina says:

    he is a great teacher.

  2. Visitor says:

    Rs. 1500 per class? Now who says T2F isn’t elitist in its approach!

  3. Sabeen Mahmud says:

    @Visitor: T2F makes a grand total of Rs. 375 out of that Rs. 1,500. We provide the space, electricity, the harmonium, and tea/water for Ustad Ji, not to mention the time and effort it takes to spread the word about such initiatives. Classical music is DYING in Pakistan and this is the least we can do to support our musicians. I am fed up of being accused of elitism all the time. Please come and meet me and discuss our approach and various projects – maybe you might think differently if you made the effort to understand what goes into running such a space.

    Sabeen

  4. Visitor says:

    Point taken, Sabeen. Don’t mean to pull you down or anything. You’re right, classical music IS dying in Pakistan, and even if it takes one to be a rich kid to learn it, it’s worth a shot. When it comes to something going extinct I do understand these sorts of approaches. Besides, I also appreciate your constant struggle to defend T2F’s non-elitist stance. It surely would’ve been easier to move on saying it is elitist! Well, good job and my apologies for being a bit too blunt in my previous comment.

  5. Sabeen Mahmud says:

    I have no problem with accurate bluntness, based on facts or evidence 🙂

    “Rich” kids need access to intellectual and cultural opportunities too. We live in a wasteland. Everyone can do with some sensitization. I am hatching a plan to get a few “rich kids” to subsidize music lessons for a group of not-so-rich kids. I have a very naive belief that music is the only phenomenon that can save the world 🙂

    Thanks for coming back. I got heartburn last night after reading that comment.

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